Title

"Freely and fearlessly": The 1863 New York editors' resolutions

Author First name, Last name, Institution

D. W. Bulla, Zayed University

Document Type

Book Chapter

Source of Publication

A Press Divided: Newspaper Coverage of the Civil War

Publication Date

9-8-2017

Abstract

The eighth of June in 1863 was a cool late spring day in New York. In the Astor House Hotel, at one o'clock in the afternoon, sixteen journalists representing approximately two million readers assembled for what one New York paper called one of "the most remarkable and important meetings which has occurred since the war" started. New York journalists had met in 1848 to respond to their depiction in a play titled "New York in Slices." Reporters had gathered at the Capitol in Washington, DC, at the start of the war to protest Winfield Scott's decision to limit newspaper transmissions on the telegraph lines without his approval. The editors at the Astor House were standing up for their profession. They drew up nonpartisan resolutions that declared freedom of the press to be a bedrock principle of democratic society, even in wartime—even in time of civil war.

ISBN

9781351534611

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

First Page

279

Last Page

292

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Scopus ID

85062498143

Indexed in Scopus

yes

Open Access

no

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