Title

Newspaper coverage of the rise of Lincoln in 1860: Cooper Union, the Republican convention, and the election

Author First name, Last name, Institution

David W. Bulla

Document Type

Book Chapter

Source of Publication

A Press Divided: Newspaper Coverage of the Civil War

Publication Date

9-8-2017

Abstract

In 1860, Abraham Lincoln experienced one of the most rapid transformations of a political figure in American history. Lincoln went from being a relatively unknown attorney from Illinois to sixteenth president of the United States. Before 1860, Lincoln had achieved little that would have suggested he was destined to become the nation's chief executive. Lincoln's ascent was the story of that year, which would end ominously with South Carolina seceding in December. The newspapers of the nation covered his climb to the presidency, and this study looks at how a political press covered Lincoln in 1860. In the speech, Lincoln wanted to deny the radical characterization used against the Republicans by critics in the Democratic Party. Lincoln said of the Democrats: "You say we are sectional. We deny it." Although historians have pointed to the Cooper Union speech as a turning point for Lincoln, coverage in the press was relatively limited.

ISBN

9781351534611

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

First Page

3

Last Page

18

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities

Scopus ID

85062556834

Indexed in Scopus

yes

Open Access

no

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