Title

Little Englanders or Big Britainers? The UK and EU role conceptions during the Brexit bill debate

Author First name, Last name, Institution

Justin Gibbins, Zayed University

ORCID Identifiers

0000-0003-1052-0432

Document Type

Article

Source of Publication

Politics and Policy

Publication Date

1-1-2022

Abstract

This article utilizes role theory to examine UK MPs' conceptions of the roles of the UK and the EU. Employing the House of Commons debates on the notification of withdrawal from the EU in early 2017, or the Brexit bill, this study outlines the multiple roles each actor possesses according to British parliamentarians. Organized according to the positions of whether the politicians supported leave and remain, rather than on how they voted, the findings are organized into role contestations based on three faultlines. The first is a clash between global and regional UK roles revealing identity-based discord over the post-Brexit vision of its international relations. The second is popular versus parliamentary invocations of national sovereignty which echo the struggle between pluralist and elite configurations of sovereignty and democracy. The last is whether the EU functions as a materialist realist-bound power or an ideational norm-creating power. Related Articles: Cerami, Alfio. 2011. “Social Mechanisms in the Establishment of the European Economic and Monetary Union.” Politics & Policy 39(3): 345–72. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-1346.2011.00294.x. Igwe, Paul Agu, Chinedu Ochinanwata, and Nnamdi O. Madichie. 2021. “The ‘Isms’ of Regional Integration: What Do Underlying Interstate Preferences Hold for the ECOWAS Union? Politics & Policy 49(2): 280–308. https://doi.org/10.1111/polp.12396. Pompl, Solange, and Sergiu Gherghina. 2019. “Messages and Familiar Faces: Crowdfunding in the 2017 U.K. Electoral Campaign.” Politics & Policy 47(3): 436–63. https://doi.org/10.1111/polp.12301.

ISSN

1555-5623

Publisher

Wiley

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Keywords

Brexit, Britain, discourse, European Union, fragmentation, ideationalism, identity, leave, national identity, national roles, power, regionalization, remain, role theory, sovereignty, United Kingdom

Scopus ID

85125152645

Indexed in Scopus

yes

Open Access

no

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