Author First name, Last name, Institution

Roberto Fabbri, Zayed University

Document Type

Article

Source of Publication

Journal of Architecture

Publication Date

5-26-2022

Abstract

Museums that have recently been completed in the Gulf present a recurrent strategy. The emphasis is often on the container rather than the content. In this framework, architecture is the language that, through visual metaphors alluding to local traditions, generates a contextual linkage and a sense of place. Therefore, none of these latest museums is designed as a building. Instead, it is a desert rose, a falcon's feather, a sail, or any other reference to Gulf iconography. The present text analyses the meaning of symbolic language in architecture by comparing a series of case studies in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), culminating with Jean Nouvel's antipodal proposals for the National Museum in Qatar and the Louvre Abu Dhabi. The paper argues that the validation of buildings through visual allusions to locality is a recurrent feature of recent Gulf museums, as a response to a fluid context in constant adjustment on the tradition-modernity axis.

ISSN

1360-2365

Publisher

Informa UK Limited

Disciplines

Architecture

Keywords

LOUVRE-ABU-DHABI, QATAR

Indexed in Scopus

no

Open Access

yes

Open Access Type

Hybrid: This publication is openly available in a subscription-based journal/series

Included in

Architecture Commons

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